How to Make a CD Sticker & Label

by Erica Sweeney ; Updated September 28, 2017

If you burn a lot of CDs and don’t label them, finding a specific one can be nearly impossible. Making your own CD labels allows you to organize your CD library, find CDs when you are looking for them and be creative with your covers. CD labels stick right on the CD and can be customized with graphics and text. Creating a customized CD label or sticker can help to personalize a burned CD so that it would make a great gift. CD label templates can be downloaded into Microsoft Word from Microsoft Office Online.

Purchase CD labels or stickers from an office supply store. Be sure to read all of the instructions that come with the labels so that you can print them correctly.

Launch a Web browser and navigate to the Microsoft Office Online website (see Resources).

Click on "Templates" at the top, type “CD labels” in the Search For field and click "Search." Look for templates that are available in Word and that match the manufacturer’s product number that is printed on the labels that you purchased. There are several templates from which to choose – some are plain, while others have lots of graphics and text already on them.

Click on a template. Click "Download." Save the template on your computer. Double-click the template to open it in Word.

Add text to the template. Most templates already have text boxes in them. To enter text, click in the text box and enter your own text. To add more text boxes, click on the "Insert" tab on the toolbar and click on "Text Box" in the Text section. Click "Draw Text Box" and your cursor will resemble a cross. Click and drag to draw the text box.

Format the text. Use the tools in the Font section of "Home" tab to bold, re-size or change the color of the text.

Add graphics to the template. In the Insert tab, choose "Picture" to add a photograph from your computer or "Clip Art" to add a graphic. If you choose "Picture," locate the photo on your computer and click "Insert." If you choose "Clip Art," a box will appear on the side of the screen allowing you to search for types of images. Double-click on a graphic to insert it into the template.

About the Author

Erica Sweeney is a freelance writer and editor based in Little Rock, Ark. She has a master's in journalism from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Her work has been published at SaidIt.org, Arkansas Times, Aging Arkansas and Arkansas Business.

Photo Credits

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