How to Remove CD Scratches in the Freezer

by Randa Morris ; Updated October 25, 2017

While there are many ways to fix a scratched CD without spending money on professional products or repairs. Placing your damaged disk in the freezer may well be the cheapest and easiest way to accomplish the task at hand. The process takes a few hours to complete, but is well worth the money you will save on CD replacement, repair products and outside servicing.

Place your damaged CD in the freezer, taking care to make sure the recorded side is face up. Be sure that nothing else in the freezer touches the disk.

Leave the CD in the freezer for several hours or overnight; just make sure you remember to take it out first thing in the morning.

Remove the CD from the freezer, taking care not to touch any part of the recorded side.

Lay the CD face up in a place where it will not be disturbed. You might want to rest it on a clean, dry towel. While this is not necessary, it will help speed up the thawing process. It will also help absorb some of the moisture that will collect on the bottom of the disk.

Allow the CD to return to room temperature on its own. Do not rub or wipe the disk while it is still cold.

Feel the sides and underside of the disk in order to make sure that it has thawed completely. The CD should have reached room temperature in less than an hour's time. It should feel slightly damp but not cold to the touch.

Wipe away any moisture with a clean, dry cloth. Take care to make sure that the disk is completely dry before you attempt to play it. If there is moisture left on the CD when you attempt to play it, it could cause damage to your CD player.

Insert the disk into your player, and voila! with no expense, and just a little effort, you should have a completely repaired disk.

About the Author

Randa Morris began her freelance career in 1994 as staff reporter for the "Ogemaw County Herald." She works as a full-time content producer for online and print publications. Her writing is often motivated by her work with adult and child trauma survivors. Morris received level two trauma certification from The National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children.