How to Write in WordPad

by Crystal Bench

Microsoft WordPad is a free program that tags along with Microsoft's operating systems. It is a small word processor, able to change fonts and font size, as well as create and display colored text. It can do other basic formatting to your document, such as numbering lists and left, right, center and justified text alignment. These functions make WordPad more powerful than Notepad; however, WordPad lacks a spelling and grammar check function, which is a disadvantage of the much more powerful Microsoft Word programs.

Open the "Start" menu. Click on "All Programs." Click on "Accessories." and on "WordPad." This will open the WordPad program. Begin typing.

Change the font by selecting the desired font from the larger drop-down menu on the top line of the "Font" section of the task bar at the top of the window. Change the font by selecting the desired size from the smaller drop-down menu on the top line of the "Font" section of the task bar at the top of the window. The "Font" section also has buttons to toggle between bold, italics, underline and strike-through writing, as well as subscripts and superscripts. You can also change the color of your typing, and highlight your writing with drop-down menus on the bottom line of the "Font" section of the task bar.

Change the alignment and spacing of your typed lines with the buttons in the "Paragraph" section of the task bar. The buttons on the top line of the section decrease the indent, increase the indent, add numbering and change line spacing, respectively. The buttons along the bottom line of the section control right alignment, center alignment, left alignment, justified alignment, and spacing between paragraphs, respectively.

About the Author

Crystal Bench is a senior studying applied mathematics at Brigham Young University, Idaho. Along with her Bachelor of Arts, she has clusters in French, 3-D art, and physical science. Bench is also an avid writer, with work ranging from short stories to nonfiction pieces of many kinds, and even a few forays into poetry.