How to Tell What Xbox Version You Have

by Dave Wilson

Microsoft's XBox gaming system has a wide scope of popularity due to the number of games it can play, along with serving as an entertainment center that lets you view DVDs and movies downloaded from the Internet. Changing the Xbox configuration using a modification chip (also known as a "mod chip") has become a popular hobby for those that wish to experiment with the Xbox console. Find the version number of your Xbox console when looking to make hardware modifications.

1

Face the back of the Xbox and locate the serial number tag. Note the long number located beside the "Serial No." text on the tag. Note the number next to the "MFG. Date" text on the tag.

2

Identify the last two numbers at the end of the "Serial No." text noted above. If the numbers are "03" or "02," and the number next to the "MFG Date" text is prior to November 2002 (2002-10-31 or earlier), then the Xbox is a version 1.0 model.

3

Identify the last two numbers at the end of the "Serial No." tag; if the numbers are "02" and the number next to the "MFG Date" text is later than November 2002 (2002-10-31 or later), then the Xbox is a version 1.1.

4

Identify the last two numbers at the end of the "Serial No." text; if the numbers are "05" or "06," note the fourth and fifth numbers from the end of the "Serial No." number, then refer to "Table 3.3 Serial Number Check" in the "Pearson Technology Group:Identifying Your Xbox Revision" document. If the number is in the table, then the Xbox version number is listed under the "Revision" column in the same row as the number. If the number is not in the table then refer to the number that is closest in value to the number noted in the "Serial No." and the "Revision" number in the same row which is the version number of the Xbox.

About the Author

Dave Wilson has been writing technical articles since 1993, including manuals, instructional "how-to" tips and online publications with various websites. Wilson holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and has Microsoft, Cisco, and ISC2 (CISSP) technical certifications. He also has experience with a broad range of computer platforms, embedded systems, network appliances and Linux.

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