Strikethrough Formatting in Microsoft Project

by Julius Vandersteen

When you are managing a project with Microsoft Project, you view various tasks in the application window. If a task is no longer needed, you can cancel it, or inactivate the task. Microsoft Project uses strikethrough formatting through the name of an inactivated task to show its changed status. Text formatted with strikethrough has a horizontal line running through each word.

Strikethrough Formatting

People use strikethrough formatting in documents to indicate that the material is no longer accurate or when they otherwise want to delete it but keep a record of it. For example, a word-processing document contains a paragraph with information that you have just determined is obsolete or does not apply, so you format the words with strikethrough to let readers see the old information but to realize that it no longer applies. Microsoft Project uses strikethrough formatting to let you keep a task in view while showing that it is now inactive.

Inactive Task

When you are analyzing a project in Microsoft Project, you could determine that you no longer need to complete a certain task, or you may now lack resources to finish it, so you want to cancel it. Inactivating a task enables you to keep a record of the task instead of deleting it and removing it from view. If the situation changes and you obtain the resources to finish the task, you can reactivate it and remove the strikethrough formatting.

About Microsoft Project

Microsoft Project is an application that you can use to manage a large number of activities for your projects and programs. Use Microsoft Project to identify the amount of work required for different aspects of your project, generate status reports, and compare current values in the budget to the values you projected earlier during the planning phase.

Project Management

You can use Microsoft Project to manage complicated projects, viewing multiple tasks with their milestones and completion-due dates. The application enables you to allocate resources to different aspects of a project, and mark which tasks are important and urgent. You can write notes about tasks, as well as add hyperlinks to Internet pages for more information about a task.

About the Author

Julius Vandersteen has been a freelance writer since 1999. His work has appeared in “The Los Angeles Times,” “Wired” and “S.F. Weekly.” Vandersteen has a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from San Francisco State University.

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