How to Speed Up an AVI File

by James Red

Changing the actual speed of an AVI file is not simple because it requires that the file get re-encoded at a different frame rate. This will usually cause the video and audio to become out of sync, and may create other playback problems as well. A more practical solution is to adjust the speed at which the AVI file is played. This cuts down on audio/video synchronization problems and is much easier.

Using VLC Media Player to Change Playback Speed

Download and install the VLC Media Player (see Resources, below). Launch the program after installation is complete.

Go to "Media" then "Open File." Select the AVI file you want to play and click "Open."

Right-click on the video while it is playing and go to "playback" then "faster" or "faster (fine)." This will speed up the playback of the video, but not change the actual encoding of the AVI.

Using Media Player Classic to Change Playback Speed

Download and install Media Player Classic (see Resources, below). Launch the program after installation is complete.

Go to "File" then "Quick Open File." Select the AVI you want to play and click "Open."

Press "Ctrl" + "Up" while the video is playing to increase playback speed. This will speed up the playback of the video, but will not change the actual encoding of the AVI.

Using VirtualDub to Re-Encode at a Higher Speed

Download the VirtualDub zip folder from the official website (see Resources, below). Unzip the folder and double-click on the "VeeDub.exe" file to launch the program.

Go to "File" then "Open Video File." Select the AVI file you want to speed up and click "Open."

Go to "Video" then "Frame Rate." Select "Change fram rate to (fps)" and type in a number higher than 30 to speed up the video. Click "Ok."

Go to "File" and "Save as AVI" to save a copy of the AVI with sped up video. This will change the actual encoding of the file, creating a copy that is faster than the original AVI.

About the Author

Residing in Pittsburgh, Pa., James Red has been a writer for over 10 years. He has work appearing in various magazines, newsweeklies and popular websites including "Wizard Magazine," "Big Shot" and Bullz-eye.com. He holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Point Park University and another in film studies from Bowling Green State University.