How to Set Up Wi-Fi Connection for a Toshiba Satellite

by David Weedmark
Coffee shops are common places with free Wi-Fi availability.

Coffee shops are common places with free Wi-Fi availability.

The first time you turn on a Toshiba Satellite, it assists you in connecting to your preferred Wi-Fi network. However, you can change your Wi-Fi network at any time, using the same Settings charm available on all Windows 8 laptops. Whether you are at home, at the office, in a hotel or sitting in a coffee shop, you can select a new Wi-Fi network to connect to the Internet, provided of course that you know the network's password.

1

Drag your finger from the right edge of the screen on the Satellite's screen, or move the cursor with the touchpad to the top-right corner and drag it downward.

2

Select the "Settings" charm and then select the "Wi-Fi" icon, which looks like a series of vertical bars. This opens the Networks window.

3

Locate your preferred Wi-Fi network in the list that appears. If you don't see it immediately, wait a few seconds for the laptop to list all available networks in your current location.

4

Select your Wi-Fi network by tapping it on the screen or clicking it with the touchpad. Select "Connect."

5

Type your Wi-Fi password when prompted. Select "Next."

Tip

  • check Toshiba Satellites have an airplane mode that disables or enables the Wi-Fi antenna in your laptop. To turn Wi-Fi on or off, press the "F12" key on the keyboard. You can also turn airplane mode off or on by tapping or clicking the "Airplane Mode On/Off" button in the Networks window.

Warning

  • close Information in this article applies to Toshiba Satellites available in October 2013 with Windows 8. It may vary slightly or significantly with other versions or products.

About the Author

A published author and professional speaker, David Weedmark has advised businesses and governments on technology, media and marketing for more than 20 years. He has taught computer science at Algonquin College, has started three successful businesses, and has written hundreds of articles for newspapers and magazines throughout Canada and the United States.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Mensch und Computer 30 image by Sven Rausch from Fotolia.com