How to Set Up Gigabyte Teaming

by Chris Hoffman

Many Gigabyte motherboards include two Ethernet ports, known as dual LAN, with teaming support. When teaming is enabled, the computer can connect to two separate networks and split its traffic between the two, taking advantage of each connection's bandwidth. Teaming also ensures that, if one network goes down or can't access the Internet, the computer automatically uses the other network, preventing any network downtime. Teaming is a feature of the built-in Realtek Ethernet adapter and is configured using Realtek's included utility.

Insert the Gigabyte motherboard driver disc into your computer's disc drive.

Click the "Run Setup.exe" option that appears in the Windows AutoPlay pop-up.

Click "Application Software" at the left side of the Gigabyte window that appears, click "Install Application Software" at the top of the window, click the "Install" button under "Realtek Ethernet Diagnostic Utility" and install it by following the instructions on your screen.

Restart your computer by clicking "Start," clicking the arrow to the right of "Shut Down" and clicking "Restart."

Click "Start," "All Programs," "Realtek," "Diagnostic Utility" and "Realtek Ethernet Diagnostic Utility."

Click "Teaming" in the middle of the Realtek Ethernet Diagnostic Utility window and click the "Create Team" button.

Type a name for the team into the "Team Name" box.

Select the teaming mode your hub requires by clicking it in the "Teaming Mode" list. If you don't know, leave this option as the default "Link Aggregation\LACP (802.3ad)."

Click the checkboxes to the left of each Ethernet adapter in the list, and click "OK."

Tips

  • check The team connection appears in the Windows network adapter list as a third connection using the "Realtek Virtual Miniport" driver.
  • check Disable teaming by clicking the name of the team in the Realtek Ethernet Diagnostic Utility window and clicking "Remove."

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Chris Hoffman is a technology writer and all-around tech geek who writes for PC World, MakeUseOf, and How-To Geek. He's been using Windows since Windows 3.1 was released in 1992.