How to Resolve Conflicts in Wireless Frequencies

by Dave Wilson

Wireless local area networks (WLANs) can be supported by a number of different frequencies. Frequency availability partially depends upon the regulations within the country in which the WLAN is installed. Every frequency is subject to radio interference; however, the type of transmission that can cause interference varies depending upon the properties of the radio frequency in use on the network. You can minimize WLAN radio interference by configuring frequencies that avoid interference or by changing the network to support a different wireless band that is less susceptible to interference in the local area.

Remove wireless 2.4 Ghz phones and microwave ovens from the vicinity of both the wireless computers and the wireless AP or router.

Configure the wireless AP or router to support the 802.11b/g configuration and set the wireless frequency to channel 6. Configure the wireless adapters installed in computers that connect to the wireless network to support 802.11b/g, and set the frequency of the wireless adapters to channel 6. Connect to the network from the wireless computers and verify performance over a 24-hour period, connecting to Web sites and other computers on the network. Proceed to the next step if disconnections or poor performance occur.

Configure the wireless AP or router to support the 802.11b/g configuration, and set the wireless frequency to channel 11. Configure the wireless adapters installed in computers that connect to the wireless network to support 802.11b/g, and set the frequency of the wireless adapters to channel 11. Connect to the network from the wireless computers and verify performance over a 24-hour period, connecting to Web sites and other computers on the network. Continue to the next step if disconnections or poor performance occur.

Configure the wireless AP or router to support the 802.11b/g configuration, and set the wireless frequency to channel 1. Configure the wireless adapters installed in computers that connect to the wireless network to support 802.11b/g, and set the frequency of the wireless adapters to channel 1. Connect to the network from the wireless computers and verify performance over a 24-hour period, connecting to Web sites and other computers on the network. Go to the next step if disconnections or poor performance occur.

Configure the wireless AP or router to support the 802.11a configuration, and then configure the wireless adapters installed in each computer to support the 802.11a configuration. Connect to the network from the wireless computers and verify performance over a 24-hour period, repeating the previous 24-hour test to confirm that the issue is resolved.

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About the Author

Dave Wilson has been writing technical articles since 1993, including manuals, instructional "how-to" tips and online publications with various websites. Wilson holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and has Microsoft, Cisco, and ISC2 (CISSP) technical certifications. He also has experience with a broad range of computer platforms, embedded systems, network appliances and Linux.

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