How to Repair Windows XP Without a Disc

by Cameron Easey

Windows XP is an operating system that was developed and came preinstalled on computer systems sold since 2001. The operating system was also sold online and at retail stores as a upgrade or as a full version. Computers from various manufactures such as Dell and HP included a recovery disk that could be used to reinstall the operating system. However, these disks can get lost or damaged and as a result may not be available to use to run a repair. Fortunately, there are ways to repair Windows XP without a disc.

Perform a system restore. Windows XP has a feature built into the operating system that saves a restore point for the system which can then be restored if there is a problem. Click on the "Start" button, go to "Programs," select "Accessories" and then "System Restore."

Perform a system recovery. Most computers that came preinstalled with Windows XP have a partition on the hard drive with an image of the operating system. Press the F8 key during the computer's startup to access Windows Advanced Options Menu to access the Recovery Console from the existing hard drive.

Restart the system using the last known good configuration. Press the key during the computers startup sequence to access the Windows Advanced Options Menu. Use the arrow keys and select the option for "Last Known Good Configuration," and press the Enter key.

Restore a backup from the Windows Registry. A third party program called RegSeeker can be used to make a backup as well as restore a previous backup of the registry. Double-click the icon on the desktop after installing the program and select "Backup." Double-click on the selected backup file, and then click the "Restore" option.

Clean the registry to get rid of bad and obsolete entires. Use RegSeeker to scan and clean entries from the registry. Open the program and select "Clean the Registry" on the left. Select either the "Auto Clean" button or the "OK" button to start scanning the registry.

Tip

  • check Always make a backup of the Windows Registry before deleting any entries. Contact the computer manufacturer for a recovery disk if none of the options work.

Warning

  • close Turning off system restore in Windows XP prevents the system from creating a restore point.

About the Author

Cameron Easey has over 15 years customer service experience, with eight of those years in the insurance industry. He has earned various designations from organizations like the Insurance Institute of America and LOMA. Easey earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and history from Western Michigan University.