How to Repair a Corrupted Master Boot Record (MBR)

by eHow Contributor

If you are planning modifying the Master Boot Record (MBR) on your computer, then you should know how to repair the MBR incase something goes wrong. This article will give you a couple techniques on repairing the MBR.

If you are using Linux on your computer system, then you would restart your system with the LiveCD in the cd-drive. Ensure that cdrom/dvdrom is the boot item that your computer looks to load an OS. Once the LiveCD has loaded, you simply re-install the Grub boot-loader.

I f your operating system (OS) is one of the OS offered by Microsoft and you have a bootable floppy disk with FDisk.exe on it, then you boot your system with the floppy disk. After the DOS has disk has loaded, type in the following at the prompt: "fdisk mbr". This will repair the MBR on the first hard drive. Note: You may have to go into the BIOS and change the Boot order so that the floppy appears on the list before the hard drive.

If your OS is Windows 95/98/98 SE/ME/NT/2000 you have the option of creating a bootable DOS disk. Make one put the DOS collect of commands on the disk and store it in a safe place.

If you have a Windows OS greater than the Windows 3.x then you have the option loading the install disk at bootup and using the repair option on the install menu. Note: The repair method has changed since the advent of Windows XP, so the steps you take after selecting the repair option are different so follow the prompts.

Tips

  • check Try to keep a rescue disk at your dispoal to aid in repairs you may need to
  • check make.
  • check Keep the Windows Install Disk available also.

Warnings

  • close Do not try to manually repair the MBR unless you are familiar with the MBR
  • close architecture as further corruption of the MBR can occur.

Items you will need

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