How to Repair a Background Intelligent Transfer Service in XP

by Mike Benson
Background Intelligent Transfer Service is used to download updates from Microsoft.

Background Intelligent Transfer Service is used to download updates from Microsoft.

The Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) is used for asynchronous file transfers. BITS is used in applications such as Windows Update and Windows Live. By default, the service is set to only turn on when needed. If you attempt to use an application that relies on BITS and the service fails to start, the application will not be able to start the file transfer. Fortunately, you can repair BITS by manually re-registering its library files into memory and resetting the security permissions of the program.

1

Press the "Windows" and "R" keys simultaneously. This loads a Run box.

2

Type "Cmd" and press "Enter." This loads the Windows Command Prompt.

3

Paste "sc sdset bits D:(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;SY)(A;;CCDCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRSDRCWDWO;;;BA)(A;;CCLCSWLOCRRC;;;AU)(A;;CCLCSWRPWPDTLOCRRC;;;PU)" into the Command Prompt and press "Enter."

If entered correctly, you see the message "[SC] SetServiceObjectSecurity SUCCESS" after pressing "Enter."

4

Type or paste "Regsvr32 %windir%\system32\qmgr.dll" and press "Enter."

5

Type or paste "Regsvr32 %windir%\system32\qmgrprxy.dll" and press "Enter."

6

Type "Exit" and press "Enter" to close the Command Prompt.

7

Press the "Windows" and "R" keys simultaneously.

8

Type "Services.msc" and press "Enter." This loads the Services configuration panel.

9

Double-click "Background Intelligent Transfer Service." This opens the properties for the service.

10

Ensure that the "Startup Type" is set to "Manual." If it isn't, click in the drop-down menu and select "Manual." Press the "Apply" button to save the change.

11

Click the "Start" button. Close the Services configuration panel.

About the Author

Mike Benson has been a freelance writer since 2000. He has authored tech guides on eHow as well as product and game reviews on a number of websites. Benson has focused his career in information technology and is educated in COMPTIA A+, electronics, A, B, C networking, search engine evaluation and programming. Benson has a certification of computer fundamentals and literacy.

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