How to Remove Wax From Computer Screens

by Krista Martin

Your laptop or desktop should be cleaned frequently to keep it in good condition and maintain a clean, new appearance. Computer screens can easily attract dust, dirt and also wax. Wax can be difficult and tricky to remove from your computer, and vigorous scrubbing can harm a delicate monitor. You should tackle the wax spot first and then proceed to clean your computer screen fully.

Click "Start" and "Shut Down" to turn off your computer. If you have a desktop you can avoid this by just turning off the computer screen. Press the power button on the computer monitor. Just to be safe, it is recommended that you turn off your computer completely when applying any solutions or cleaners to it.

Dab a bit of butter or olive oil on a cotton cloth and rub the affected portion of the screen in a circular motion. Apply the cloth gently so it doesn't affect the screen. This should remove any type of wax that is on your monitor. You may have to rub it for some time before it comes off.

Wipe down the monitor with a separate piece of cloth, or let it dry on its own.

Spray or pour a cleaning solution onto a cotton cloth and wipe down the screen. Use an ammonia-free, diluted window cleaner or 50 percent rubbing alcohol. Water can leave wet spots and some glass cleaners will leave behind a greasy film. Never spray or directly apply liquid onto the monitor. Avoid using solvents that may contain chemicals that could damage your computer.

Wipe the screen dry with a cotton cloth. For upkeep you can dust it with a microfiber towel to help maintain the clean and new appearance of the monitor.

Press the power button on your computer or monitor to turn the computer back on when the computer monitor is fully dry.

Items you will need

About the Author

Krista Martin has been writing professionally since 2005. She has written for magazines, newspapers and websites including Live Listings, "Homes & Living" magazine and the "Metro Newspaper." Martin holds an honors Bachelor of Arts in English from Memorial University of Newfoundland and a Master of Journalism from the University of Westminster.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera monitor image by Orlando Florin Rosu from Fotolia.com