How To Remove a TomTom GPS From Its Mount

by Adrian Grahams
Remove the TomTom and mount from the windshield or dashboard before detaching the mount.

Remove the TomTom and mount from the windshield or dashboard before detaching the mount.

Most TomTom GPS satellite navigation devices ship with a separate slide or clip mount so that you can insert and remove the device while leaving the mount fixed to your dashboard or windshield. However, the TomTom Go 800 series, Via series and Start 20 series of devices all come with integrated ball-and-socket mounts that you'll need to rotate in order to detach the device. Removing the device from its mount helps if you want to take the TomTom with you when leaving your car, or if you need to send the TomTom for servicing or repair.

1

Detach the TomTom and its mount from the windshield or dashboard in your vehicle. The mount pad should easily pull away from the surface.

2

Unplug the charger cable so that you can move the TomTom and its mount without wires getting in the way.

3

Lift the mount and rotate it to around 90 degrees so that it's positioned at a right angle to the back panel of the TomTom device.

4

Push the groove of the ball in the ball-and-socket joint against the edge of the socket.

5

Apply firm but gentle pressure in the direction of the groove to lever the mount out of the socket.

Tips

  • check Always apply pressure in the direction of the groove because the TomTom won't detach from the mount if you try to push in the other direction.
  • check To reattach the mount, place the ball over the socket on the back of the TomTom and gently push the groove in the ball against the socket until it clicks into place.

Warning

  • close Never try to force the ball from the socket. If the mount proves difficult to remove, ensure it's positioned at a 90-degree angle to the back of the TomTom and that you're applying pressure in the direction of the groove.

About the Author

Adrian Grahams began writing professionally in 1989 after training as a newspaper reporter. His work has been published online and in various newspapers, including "The Cornish Times" and "The Sunday Independent." Grahams specializes in technology and communications. He holds a Bachelor of Science, postgraduate diplomas in journalism and website design and is studying for an MBA.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Rayes/Photodisc/Getty Images