How to Remove Microsoft Paint

by Dave Wilson
A kiosk computer has a single purpose and runs a single program for the user interface.

A kiosk computer has a single purpose and runs a single program for the user interface.

The Microsoft Windows 7 operating system can be deployed for use in single purpose computers such as kiosks that are configured to access only specific Internet web sites. Locking down a kiosk computer involves removing programs that are not required which saves hard drive space and can increase performance and security. Access and remove the program files for the Microsoft Paint application to save space and increase security.

1

Log in to the computer using the user name and password of an account that has Administrator permissions on the computer. Click the "Start" button and then the "Search" box and type "%windir%\System32" in the "Search" box and tap the "Enter" key.

2

Right-click on the "mspaint.exe" file in the window that appears and click "Properties" in the menu that displays. Click the "Security" tab in the "Properties" window. Click "Advanced" and then click the "Owner" tab.

3

Click "Edit" and then click on the name of the account currently logged into the computer from the list of accounts presented and click the "OK" button. Click "OK" in the "Properties" window. Right-click on the "mspaint.exe" file and click "Delete" in the menu that appears.

4

Double-click on the "en-US" directory in the "System32" window. The "en-US" window will open. Right-click on the "mspaint.exe.mui" file in the window that appears and click "Properties" in the menu that displays. Click the "Security" tab in the "Properties" window. Click "Advanced" and then click the "Owner" tab.

5

Click "Edit" and then click on the name of the account currently logged into the computer from the list of accounts presented and click the "OK" button. Click "OK" in the "Properties" window. Right-click on the "mspaint.exe.mui" file and click "Delete" in the menu that appears.

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About the Author

Dave Wilson has been writing technical articles since 1993, including manuals, instructional "how-to" tips and online publications with various websites. Wilson holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and has Microsoft, Cisco, and ISC2 (CISSP) technical certifications. He also has experience with a broad range of computer platforms, embedded systems, network appliances and Linux.

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