How to Print Out Checks From the Computer

by Christopher Capelle

Computers have allowed us to streamline tasks and reduce the tedium of performing manual tasks, check writing included. Rather than handwrite a check and then record it in the ledger and then reconcile it by hand, there are financial software packages that allow you to easily print checks on the computer.

Quicken by Intuit

Establish your checking account in your software package. The most popular software by far is Quicken, though there is a strong preference for Microsoft Money by a vocal minority of computer users.

Every bill you receive requires you to send a check

Set up any categories and payees ahead of time, if possible. This step will allow you to help automate the process for future use. Once you've established a payee and all the associated data (address, account number), you can use the "auto fill" functionality to quickly and easily print checks to the same payee over and over, without having to enter all of the information again.

Writing checks by hand is a thing of the past

Enter the transaction into your software. Make sure you press "Return" or "Enter" after entering the amount, to register it in your software.

Printing your checks in Quicken

Select "Print Check" while you're highlighted on the transaction.

Printer checks: 2 per sheet

In the "Page Setup" window, select which configuration of checks you have. You will have to set this preference based on the type of checks you have.

Printer checks: 3 per sheet

Select "Print" to print the checks. You will then confirm if your check has printed correctly. If it has, then select "Yes."

Sign the check, detach one of the stubs for your records, and give the check to the payee.

Tip

  • check Practice printing a few times with a void check or a blank sheet of paper. Make sure you have the correct paper size and orientation selected before printing.

Warning

  • close Keep your blank checks under lock and key.

About the Author

Christopher Capelle is a freelance copywriter with over two decades of experience. Subjects of his writing include the business and technology fields, consumer products and home repair/improvement. He graduated from The University of Connecticut and earned a master's degree in journalism from Iona College.