How to Open Ports on My Router for "Age of Empires 3"

by Alan Bradford
Open up the ports specified by the game to access or host an online multiplayer game.

Open up the ports specified by the game to access or host an online multiplayer game.

To be able to play a multiplayer game of Age of Empires 3, either over the Internet or on a local network, you must ensure that your router is configured to keep the particular ports open for the game to use. If you don't set up your router to open these ports, you may get a "Failed to Join Game" message. This configuration is called port forwarding and is set up by accessing your router through a Web browser.

Open your Web browser and enter the Internet protocol address of your router in the address bar, and then press the "Enter" key on your keyboard. An example of a router IP address is 192.168.1.1.

Click the link or tab labeled "Port Forwarding" or "Port Range Forward." The name may be different depending on your router.

Enter "2300" as the beginning or start of the first range.

Enter "2310" as the end of the first range.

Ensure that both TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) and UDP (User Datagram Protocol) are enabled as the protocol for the 2300-to-2310 port range.

Enter "80" as the start and end of the next port range.

Select TCP as the protocol for the 80 port range.

Enter the IP address of your computer next to each port range.

Enable each port range, if necessary.

Save the changes in your router and wait for the router information to update.

Tips

  • check If you are using a firewall application such as Windows Firewall, you will need to open the same port range for the Age of Empires 3 to pass through the firewall.
  • check Some routers allow you to enable a "Gaming" setting within the configuration panel.
  • check Older routers may not allow you to enter a port range. In this case, you must enter a separate forwarding for each port number, such as 2300, 2301, 2302, 2303.

Warning

  • close Be careful to leave all other router configuration settings untouched. Changing other settings may disrupt your network service.

About the Author

Alan Bradford began his career as a technical writer and editor in 2000. He has worked in a variety of fields, including medical devices, military applications and PC/console game development. Bradford specializes in such topics as computers, PC gaming and family and spiritual life. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from San Diego State University.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera wlan router 02 image by pmphoto from Fotolia.com