Microsoft Outlook Uses

by Jesse Adams

Microsoft Outlook is the standard task management and communication software found in most business settings. Its integration with the corporate Exchange server allows the software to communicate with iterations of Outlook on other computers. In other words, co-workers can share contacts, calendars and personal messages through the software. Whether for personal or business use, Outlook can provide a user with a variety of tools and features.

Outlook replaces the standard desktop calendar with a portable, digital version.

Microsoft Outlook is the standard task management and communication software found in most business settings. Its integration with the corporate Exchange server allows the software to communicate with iterations of Outlook on other computers. In other words, co-workers can share contacts, calendars and personal messages through the software. Whether for personal or business use, Outlook can provide a user with a variety of tools and features.

Email

The most common use of Microsoft Outlook is its email functionality. When Outlook was introduced, it was designed to be a simple email client, not a full-functioning information manager. The email feature includes support for a variety of web-based email accounts (including Microsoft's own Hotmail and Live mail), POP3 accounts, IMAP accounts and Exchange accounts.

Calendar

Outlook also features a powerful calendar application. Users can enter appointments, events and meetings and have them displayed on the Outlook calendar. The software can also be set-up to remind users of those appointments and events via a pop-up message, email and even through a text message. Further, Outlook is designed to handle multiple calendars, so a user can add a personal calendar with personal events (birthdays, dinner dates, etc.) and a calendar for business purposes (meetings, business trips, etc.). If your company uses an Exchange server, you will be able to share calendars with co-workers and access any calendars they happen to be sharing. This is perfect for setting up a meeting time or scheduling appointments with clients.

Contacts

Outlook features an address book function. It offers space to add personal information for a user's contacts including photos, home pages, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdays and more. The contact list is then integrated into Outlook's email function, making it simple to contact clients from one place. If your company has a networked telephone system integrated with Microsoft Outlook, a user can dial contacts simply by clicking the phone number in the contacts list. If using Outlook on an Exchange server, a user can share and access contacts from other users on the network.

To-Do List

For users who need a daily to-do list to stay on task, Outlook can provide it. Simply enter the tasks that need to be completed, with a due date and time, and Outlook will offer reminders and display the list prominently on its start page. If using an Exchange server, employers can create to-do lists for employees to complete.

Syncing

Outlook also allows a user to sync email, calendars, tasks and contacts with various web-based services, such as Microsoft's own Microsoft Office Online. It also can be synced with any Windows Mobile phone, allowing for the ultimate portability of a user's essential information. Whether on the go or working from home, a user can access any information needed.

About the Author

Jesse Adams has written professionally since 2008. He writes tutorials for technology products and websites. His work has been featured by the "International Business Times," GeekBeat.tv and other publications. Adams holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Indiana University, and is currently working on his PhD in Literature.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera calendar with bow image by Photoeyes from Fotolia.com