How to Make Yahoo My Start Page

by Steve Gregory

Although your Web browser’s default Start page is set by the developer, you can change it the Yahoo homepage at any time by accessing the browser’s feature to set a homepage. The location of the feature depends on the browser you are using. For example, if you use Google Chrome, you can access the feature through the browser’s Settings page. After you change your browser’s Start page to Yahoo, you can return to the website without entering the URL into the address bar by clicking the Home button.

Microsoft Internet Explorer

1

Launch Internet Explorer and then click the "Tools" icon, resembling a gear.

2

Choose "Internet Options" from the drop-down list to open the Internet Options window.

3

Select the "General" tab and then replace the current URL in the Homepage field with the Yahoo homepage URL.

4

Click "Apply" and then select the "OK" button.

Google Chrome

1

Launch Chrome and select the Customize and Control Chrome menu button, which has three horizontal lines.

2

Select "Settings" from the drop-down menu to open the Settings page.

3

Select the option to open a specific page or set of pages in the On Startup section.

4

Click "Set Pages" to open the Startup Pages box and then enter the Yahoo homepage URL in the Add a New Page field.

5

Click the "OK" button to set Yahoo as the Start page.

Mozilla Firefox

1

Open the Firefox browser and then enter the Yahoo homepage URL in to the address bar.

2

Select the icon on the left side of the Yahoo URL and then drag it onto the Homepage icon, which is a house.

3

Click the "Yes" button on the pop-up box to confirm that you want to make the Yahoo URL your new Start page.

Warning

  • close The information in this article applies to Internet Explorer 10, Mozilla Firefox 22 and Google Chrome version 28. Instructions may differ slightly or significantly with other versions or products.

About the Author

An avid technology enthusiast, Steve Gregory has been writing professionally since 2002. With more than 10 years of experience as a network administrator, Gregory holds an Information Management certificate from the University of Maryland and is pursuing MCSE certification. His work has appeared in numerous online publications, including Chron and GlobalPost.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images