How to Make a Newspaper on WordPad

by Kathryn Hatashita-Lee
Create a newspaper in WordPad to keep readers up-to-date.

Create a newspaper in WordPad to keep readers up-to-date.

Windows 7 includes WordPad, a basic editing program. Although WordPad lacks the range of editing commands in Microsoft Word 2010, WordPad can insert the content from a Word document. For example, a Word page layout formatted with columns for a newspaper can insert in a WordPad document. WordPad can also insert image files to add visual interest and draw attention to the news content.

1

Open the WordPad document. Click the “Start” button or press the “Windows” key. The “Start” menu” appears.

2

Type “WordPad” in the “Search programs and files” search box. Click “WordPad” on the search results. A blank WordPad document appears.

3

Click the “Insert Object” button in the “Insert” group on the “Home” tab. The “Insert Object” dialog box opens.

4

Click the radio button for “Create New.”

5

Scroll the “Object Type” text box. Click to select “Microsoft Word Document.” A blank Word document screen appears with the Word editor commands.

6

Click the “Page Layout” tab on the Word document.

7

Click the “Columns” button in the “Page Setup” group. A list of column samples appears.

8

Click the number of columns for the page layout, such as “Two” or “More Columns” for a custom look.

9

Type the content in the column format.

10

Click the “X” or “Close” button. The text copies from the Word document to the WordPad document.

11

Save this WordPad document.

Tips

  • check Edit the text in the Word document by accessing the “Font” commands in the “Home” tab. Point over the “X” button in the Word document to update changes to the WordPad document.
  • check To insert a picture in WordPad, click the “Home” tab. Click “Picture” in the “Insert” group. Click to select the image file. Click “Open.”
  • check To change from multiple columns to one column, click Word’s “Page Layout” tab. Click the “Columns” button in the “Page Setup” group. Click “One” to return to one column formatting.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images