How to Make the Internet Address Bar Go Away

by Chad Anderson

The look and feel of modern Web browsers is highly customizable, from the buttons displayed to the icons and text. Each component can be added or removed to allow for a more personalized viewing experience. Since there are a number of key combinations that will bring up a window for typing in a website address, many users choose to remove the address bar entirely to make for a cleaner interface. This is particularly helpful when working on netbooks, tablets or other devices with small screens.

Internet Explorer

1

Click the "Start" button; then click "Internet Explorer" in the menu list.

2

Click the "View" button at the top of the Internet Explorer window. Hover over the "Toolbars" item in the menu to produce a sub-menu.

3

Click the "Address Bar" option to uncheck and to hide the address bar.

Mozilla Firefox

1

Click the "Start" button, then click "Mozilla Firefox" in the menu list.

2

Click the "View" button at the top of the Mozilla Firefox window, then hover over the "Toolbars" item in the menu to produce a sub-menu.

3

Click the "Navigation Toolbar" option to uncheck and hide the address bar.

Opera

1

Click the "Start" button, then click "Opera" in the menu list.

2

Click the "Menu" button at the top of the Opera window, then hover over the "Toolbars" item in the menu to produce a sub-menu.

3

Click the "Address Bar" option to uncheck and hide the address bar.

Tip

  • check As of March 2011, the latest development version of Google Chrome is unable to hide the address bar. However, as with most browsers, you can press the "F11" key to enter kiosk or full-screen mode. The address bar will be hidden when full-screen is activated.

Warning

  • close These browsers will only be visible in your Start menu if they are your default web browser. Otherwise, you will need to use the "All Programs" menu to launch the application.

About the Author

Chad Anderson began writing professionally in 2009. He primarily contributes articles on technology and outdoor topics for various websites. His areas of interest include Linux and open-source software along with cycling and other outdoor sports. Anderson holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from the University of Nevada in Reno.