How to Install a Wireless Microsoft Optical Mouse

by Traci Joy

A Microsoft wireless optical mouse offers high quality and precise pointing, and comes at a price to fit any budget. It is one of the top selling devices on the market, and is backed by a trusted name. A major benefit of a Microsoft wireless optical mouse not only that it enhances your computer experience, but that it is quick to install.

Turn on your computer and insert the wireless mouse installation CD into the CD drive.

Wait for the CD to start automatically. If it doesn't, go to "Start", then "My Computer", then right click on the name of the CD, and then select "Play".

Follow the onscreen instructions for installing the software that came with your mouse. When finished, restart the computer. This will finish the software installation process.

Shut down your computer once again, and install fresh batteries into the mouse.

Insert the receiver into a USB port on your computer, and turn the computer back on. Your mouse is now ready to use.

Tip

  • check The radio frequencies from an optical mouse can cause slight interference with other transmissions, such as television and radios. These instructions will work for all models of the Wireless Microsoft Optical Mouse, except the Wireless Mobile Mouse 3000 Special Edition. (If you have the Mobile Mouse 3000 Special Edition, please refer to your user's manual.)

Warning

  • close If you travel on aircraft with your wireless mouse, remove the batteries, as even with the mouse off the batteries will emit radio frequency. Don't mix old and new batteries in the mouse, as this will hamper its performance.

Items you will need

About the Author

A certified nutritionist who majored in health, fitness and nutrition, Traci Vandermark has been writing articles in her specialty fields since 1998. Her articles have appeared both online and in print for publications such as Simple Abundance, "Catskill Country Magazine," "Birds and Blooms," "Cappers" and "Country Discoveries."

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera www.flickr.com