How to Identify Twitter Profile Owners

by Aaron Charles

Twitter encourages people to search out other Twitter users and to keep tabs on what they're doing, including discovering who they are. To be clear, this kind of online discovery isn't what's come to be known as cyberstalking. A cyberstalker uses online tools like Twitter to track someone for a pernicious purpose. So as long as you don't go down that road, you're within the proper bounds of Twitter and online exploration. Since not all Twitter users are forthcoming about their actual identities, and since some businesses make fake profiles for marketing purposes, you might not always be successful. However, there are a couple of methods you can try.

Twitter Profile Information

1

Sign in to Twitter. Then enter the handle (begins with the "@" symbol) of the Twitter profile you're interested in into the Twitter search bar.

2

Click the username next to the Twitter handle of the profile in the search results. This will open the profile biography.

3

Note the profile information for any clues as to who owns the profile -- including the username -- which could be the profile owner's actual name.

4

Enter any names listed in the profile into a search engine, and click on related Web links. Look for parallels between these websites and the Twitter profile, such as names and background information.

Website and Who Is Database

1

Follow the first two steps from Section 1 to access the Twitter profile's biography page. Click any website links listed there.

2

Look for the website's "About Us," About Me" or "Contact" page. Note any additional information about the person or persons linked to the Twitter profile.

3

Enter the Web address of the website into a Who Is search (links in Resources) for additional information. Note the contact information of the person listed as the owner of the domain. This could also be the owner of the Twitter profile.

About the Author

Aaron Charles began writing about "pragmatic art" in 2006 for an online arts journal based in Minneapolis, Minn. After working for telecom giant Comcast and traveling to Oregon, he's written business and technology articles for both online and print publications, including Salon.com and "The Portland Upside."

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera David Paul Morris/Getty Images News/Getty Images