How to Figure Out What My Server IP Is for Minecraft

by Aaron Parson

Although you can play Minecraft by yourself, one of its signature features is the ability to build, explore and fight with other players online. If you want to run your own Minecraft server, you need to share your computer's Internet protocol address. The IP address identifies your computer online, allowing others to connect to you. To find it, you can use Windows' built-in Ipconfig utility.

Ipconfig

1

Press "Windows-R" to open the Run window. Type "cmd" and press "Enter" to launch a command prompt.

2

Type "ipconfig" and press "Enter." The window will display several lines of information.

3

Look for the line labeled "IPv4 Address." This line displays your computer's IP address. If the number starts with "192.168," your router has assigned your computer a local IP address. This address will work to play Minecraft with other computers in your house but not with others online. If you get a local IP address but want to play over the Internet, you'll need to find your router's IP address.

Router IP

1

Write down the number on the line labeled "Default Gateway." Type it into a Web browser's address bar and press "Enter" to run the router's configuration page.

2

Log in to your router setup with the router username and password.

3

Look through the router's setup information to find your global IP address. Its location will vary by router brand. For example, Netgear routers display the IP address on the Router Status page, while Linksys routers display it on the Status tab and Belkin routers show it labeled as WAN IP in the Internet Settings box.

Tip

  • check You can also use third-party websites to identify your IP address. Many sites exist that will tell you your current IP (see Resources).

Warnings

  • close If you want to play with other users online and you have a router, you will need to set port forwarding on your router to forward port 25565 to your computer's local IP address. This process varies by router model -- check your router's instructions for further details.
  • close Information in this article applies to all Windows versions from XP through Windows 8 and may vary slightly or significantly with other versions.

About the Author

Aaron Parson has been writing about electronics, software and games since 2006, contributing to several technology websites and working with NewsHour Productions. Parson holds a Bachelor of Arts from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Dan Kitwood/Getty Images News/Getty Images