Creating an AOL Web Page

by Adam Cloe Ph.D./M.D.

What AOL will Provide

AOL (otherwise known as America Online) will give, to all of its users, the ability to create their own web page, which AOL will "host." Each user (a user is defined as a screen name) can have up to 2 megabytes for his web page. Most HTML web pages are made up of the HTML coding, which is essentially text, and pictures, so the graphics involved in the page will probably be what limits how much can be uploaded. Also, because every AOL account is allowed up to five different screen names, this means that each AOL account has 10 MB of space allotted to it for web pages.

Creating the Web Page

Most basic web pages uses HTML coding, which is a very simple set of commands that almost all Internet browsers can read. To create an HTML page, that are three different things that you can do. The simplest is to learn how to use HTML tags and commands and then create the files for each web page in a word processor. There are many HTML tutorials that are easily available on the Internet. Another option is to use computer programs which will add the specific tags and HTML formatting for you. Finally, AOL users can use a specific program called Personal Publisher, which can quickly and easily make web pages for them. On the other hand, this program is customized for very simple web pages, so it is not recommended if you wish to have images that are specially aligned, audio, a guest book or many other features.

Other Additions

Any pictures or other files that you would like to include for your web page need to be uploaded to the AOL computers that are hosting your website. This will often involve you having to open up a menu to transfer copies of any pictures that you want to use. Other features, like a website counter, can either be obtained from America Online or from other websites which can provide instructions for adding new components and customizing web pages.

About the Author

Adam Cloe has been published in various scientific journals, including the "Journal of Biochemistry." He is currently a pathology resident at the University of Chicago. Cloe holds a Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry from Boston University, a M.D. from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in pathology from the University of Chicago.