How to Create Your Own Virtual Person in a Virtual World

by Jennifer Williams

A virtual world is an Internet site created to look like a physical community with homes, shops, restaurants and night spots where users interact with each other through their avatars, or their virtual selves. Virtual worlds offer people a way to connect with one another while the avatars, or virtual people, offer a certain amount of identity protection by keeping users' actual likenesses from being shown. Sites such as Second Life, Teen Second Life and IMVU all provide avatar generators where a user makes his own virtual person. The generators allow the user to personalize every element of her avatar's physical appearance and wardrobe and requires only the installation of a plug-in for the site.

Choose which virtual world site in which to create a virtual person based on your comfort level with the site's atmosphere and content, and the appeal of the site's particular art style.

Log on to the site, create an account and download any required plug-ins so the 3D programming works as intended.

Navigate to the site's avatar generator and choose whether to create a male or a female virtual person. Personalize the avatar by selecting from the hundreds of features provided to create the coloring and style of the face and hair.

Experiment with various wardrobe options by mixing and matching the various tops, bottoms, stockings and shoes until the outfit is as you desire.

Save the virtual person so the avatar is capable of moving into the site's virtual world and interacting with other avatars.

Tip

  • check Save additional outfits, hair styles and make-up styles in the avatar's virtual closet for quick changes.

About the Author

An attorney for more than 18 years, Jennifer Williams has served the Florida Judiciary as supervising attorney for research and drafting, and as appointed special master. Williams has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Jacksonville University, law degree from NSU's Shepard-Broad Law Center and certificates in environmental law and Native American rights from Tulsa University Law.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera girl in stone alcove image by Heinz Hemken from Fotolia.com