How to Create a Database for Personnel Files With Microsoft Access

by Maureen Bruen

You can create a database using existing personnel data files in minutes if you store your personnel data in an external software application, such as a spreadsheet. Microsoft Access will read your spreadsheet and load a Microsoft Access database that gives you a relational database management system for reporting and updating.

1

Click "Start," "All Programs," then "Microsoft Access." The "Microsoft Access" dialog box will open with database options.

2

Click the radio button for "Blank Access Database" and click "OK." The "File New Database" dialog box will open.

3

Choose a name for your personnel database and type this in the "File Name" section of the "File New Database" dialog box. If you like, you can use the default database name that Microsoft Access chooses for you. Click "Create" and the personnel database will appear.

4

Click "File," "Get External Data," then "Import." This will bring you to the "Import" dialog box where you can access your external personnel data file. Find your external personnel file, click on it and click "Import."

5

Now you will see the "Import Spreadsheet Wizard" and a display of your external data file. Click "Next" and click the box next to "First Row Contains Column Headings" if your spreadsheet contains a first row with column headings.

6

Click "Next" and "In a New Table" should be checked. Click "Next" to see the Fields that will be in your database. Click "Next" again and make sure "Let Access Add Primary Key" is checked. Click "Next," enter a name for the Access database personnel file and then click "Finish."

7

You will see your new personnel database loaded as a table into your Microsoft Access database window. Now you can manage this table as you would any other database table in Microsoft Access.

Items you will need

About the Author

Maureen Bruen is a graduate of Williams College with a bachelor's degree in art history and computer science. She has been writing, programming, designing and doing photography for corporations and local governments since 1999. She started publishing technical manuals for software companies using SQL (Structured Query Language) in 1991.

Photo Credits

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