How to Copy and Paste Two Cells Into One Cell

by Colby Stream
Copy and Paste Two Cells Into One Cell

Copy and Paste Two Cells Into One Cell

Merging multiple cells into one can save you time, in a retroactive sense. The process, called "concatenating," allows you to take multiple cells which you have already typed information into and merge the information into one single cell without losing information. While the nature of the product sounds like you should be able to copy and paste from one cell into many, that process will only get you headaches and frustrations. Instead, you can use an easy formula that will only take you a few steps to master.

Open the existing Excel document in which you would like to merge multiple cells into one. If an already existing document is not available, create one by putting the information you would like in one cell into multiple.

Select the one cell in which you would like to insert all the information. Write "=(" into the formula, minus the quotation marks. This begins the formula of the merging project.

Write the cell name of the first cell you would like to merge and then insert an ampersand and quotation mark. For example, if you are merging cell A1 as part of the data, write "=sum(A1&" ". Before writing the name of the next cell, insert a space followed by a quotation mark and an ampersand. Write the name of the cell and then end the same way you ended the first cell block.

Insert all the information as described in Step 3. After the last cell block has been written, close the parentheses. The formula should look like this: "sum=(A1&" "&B1;&" "&C1;&" ... "&E1;&")" without the outer two quotation marks. Press "Enter." Your information will appear in the order you inserted it.

Tips

  • check You may insert the name of the cell blocks in any order. The order you list them will determine the order your information appears in.
  • check Insert a comma into your formula to separate each piece of data with one in the final product. Each comma should go after the last quotation mark of each cell block name.

About the Author

Colby Stream has been a writer since 2007. His work has appeared in "The Arbiter," the student newspaper of Boise State University, as well as various websites. Stream graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in communication as a presidential civic leadership scholar.

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