How to Change NAT Types on Belkin Wireless G Routers

by Ruri Ranbe

Belkin routers use Network Address Translation, which supports connecting up to 253 clients to the Internet using a single IP address. The router is assigned the public address from your broadband service, and it then utilizes NAT to provide private addresses to connected computers. NAT doesn't just expand the router's addressing capabilities; it also acts as a firewall, protecting connected devices from attack. You can set up an open NAT on your Wireless-G router to bypass the firewall when using certain programs and thereby increase data transfer speed, or you can create a completely closed NAT to lock down your network.

Open NAT

1

Navigate to "http://192.168.2.1" (without the quotes) in your Web browser.

2

Leave the Password field blank and click "Submit" to log in, or type your password into the applicable field and then press "Enter."

3

Select "Virtual Servers" from under Firewall. Enter the name of an application or service to allow through NAT in the Description field.

4

Enter the port or port range of the program or service into the Inbound Port and Private Port fields

5

Press "Windows-X" and click "Command Prompt." Type "ipconfig" (without quotes) into the console.

6

Press "Enter" and review the information under "Wireless LAN Adapter Wi-Fi" to find your IP address.

7

Return to your browser and enter your IP address into the applicable field.

8

Select "Enable" and then click "Apply Changes" to unblock access to the service.

9

Repeat the above instructions to allow additional applications or services through the NAT firewall.

Closed NAT

1

Navigate to "http://192.168.2.1" (without the quotes) in your Web browser.

2

Leave the Password field blank if logging in to the router for the first time, or enter your administrative credentials. Click "Submit."

3

Choose "Virtual Servers" from the left pane. Deselect "Enable" next to each item and then click "Apply Changes."

Tip

  • check Check the help file included with the program to determine which ports it uses. If the documentation doesn't provide details on port forwarding, look up the port information using a search engine.

About the Author

Ruri Ranbe has been working as a writer since 2008. She received an A.A. in English literature from Valencia College and is completing a B.S. in computer science at the University of Central Florida. Ranbe also has more than six years of professional information-technology experience, specializing in computer architecture, operating systems, networking, server administration, virtualization and Web design.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera wlan router 02 image by pmphoto from Fotolia.com