What Is Cell Phone Addiction?

by April Khan

Cell phone addiction is a fast growing addiction in the U.S. According to Drugrehabtreatments.com, there are over 225 million cell phone users in the U.S. and 63 percent of these are teenagers. In addition, a recent survey conducted by Pew Internet and American Life project showed that 51 percent of cell phone users felt it would be very hard to give up their cell phones, according to the Forbes Magazine website. Many of the users but old also said that the value to their cell phones more than other technologies including television Internet access. (See References 2)

Identification

Cell phone addiction is the inability to be away from your cell phone. In many cases, this means being on your cell phone five or more hours a day.

Symptoms

In teens, cell phone addiction manifests itself in rising cell phone bill charges, panicking when they’re without their phone, moodiness, frustration and a constant need to check their phone messages. General symptoms are feeling restless when not around the cell phone, irrational reactions (without cell phone around), problems at school and work, increased time on the phone and taking unnecessary risks (i.e. using the cell phone while driving).

Prevention

Set time limits for time you spend on the phone, set time aside for activities (i.e. Sports, movies and other activities that don’t involve the phone) and increase time with family and friends. If you try these measures and they don’t work you may have to seek help from a therapist.

Expert Advice

According to Drugrehabtreatments.com, experts recommend waiting to purchase a cell phone for your teenager in two other least 16 years of age. Other experts advise enforcing limits on cell phone usage.

Facts

Two children aged 12 and 13 had to be admitted to a mental hospital due to cell phone addiction, according to Drugrehabtreatment.com.

About the Author

April Khan is a medical journalist who began writing in 2005. She has contributed to publications such as "BBC Focus." In 2012, Khan received her Doctor of Public Health from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She also holds an Associate of Arts from the Art Institute of Dallas and a Master of Science in international health from University College London.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera cell phone image by sonya etchison from Fotolia.com