How Can I Change My Computer Keyboard to Type Japanese?

by Zeus Tyrone Mendoza

Windows XP comes bundled with many preset languages--including Japanese--since the operating system is used worldwide. You can change your computer keyboard to type in Japanese through Windows XP's "Regional and Language Options" menu.

Click on "Start" then "Control Panel." Select "Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options" then click on "Regional and Language Options."

Click on the "Languages" tab and check "Install files for East Asian Languages" under the "Supplemental language support" section. Then click on "Apply" to confirm the changes.

Click on the "Advanced" tab under the "Regional and Language Options" menu. Select "Japanese" under the "Language for non-Unicode programs" drop-down box. Then check "10001 (MAC - Japanese)" under the "Code page conversion tables" section.

Reboot the computer, then navigate back to the "Regional and Language Options" menu (click "Start," "Control Panel," Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options," then "Regional and Language Options"). Click on the "Languages" tab then select "Details" to bring up the "Text Services and Input Languages" menu.

Click "Add" then select "Japanese" from the "Input language" drop-down box. From the "Keyboard layout/IME" drop-down box select "Japanese" then click "OK."

Click on "Key Settings" under the preferences section to bring up the "Advanced Key Settings." Click on "Change Key Sequence" then uncheck the following boxes: "Switch input languages" and "Switch keyboard layouts." Then click "OK" to save the changes.

Warning

  • close Changing your operating system's language may interfere with the installation of future programs that need to install in English. Sometimes you will have to set your system back to English in order to install such software, then set it back into Japanese.

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About the Author

Zeus Tyrone Mendoza is an award-winning and accomplished freelance writer from California. Mendoza has contributed works published in "Kerygma" magazine, "Philippine Star Newspaper," and the monthly newsletter for the world renowned GK Community Development Foundation. Mendoza holds a B.A. in English creative writing from California State University, Northridge.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera bat japanese symbol image by michele goglio from Fotolia.com