How to Allow Multiple Users to Access a 2007 Outlook PST File at the Same Time

by Andrew McClain

Microsoft Outlook 2007 stores a wide variety of data for you, including calendars, contacts and tasks. It stores this information in a PST file, which contains the user's calendar entries, messaging data and other information. If you want multiple users to access the same PST file, you run the risk of corrupting the file and losing data. However, there are ways to share data and synchronize it with the Microsoft Exchange server. You can let users use OST files, which are offline versions of the PST file, or you can copy a PST file and use the copies on multiple computers. If you use this method, you need to repeat it to keep the copies synchronized.

Synchronized Offline Files

1

Select "Tools," then "E-mail Accounts," and then "View or change existing mail accounts." Click "Next."

2

Click on "Microsoft Exchange Server" and then "Change."

3

Select "More Settings," then the "Advanced" tab and then "Offline Folder File Settings."

4

Type the path to where you want your OST file in the "File" field. Click "OK." This will set up your OST file.

5

Select "Tools," then "Send/Receive," and then "Send/Receive All" to synchronize your OST file with the server.

Copy and Synchronize PST Files

1

Click "File," then "New," and then "Outlook Data File."

2

Click "Office Outlook Personal Folders File (pst)," and then click "OK."

3

Type a name for the new file in the "Create or Open Outlook Data File" field, and click "Open."

4

Type a name that all users will see in the "Display Name" field, and click "OK."

5

Copy the new PST file to a disk or network location.

6

Click "File," then "Import And Export."

7

Select "Import from another program or file," and click "Next."

8

Select "Personal Folder File (.pst)," and click "Next."

9

Type the path or browse to the PST file you saved in Step 5, and click "Next."

10

Select the top level of the hierarchy, and click "Finish." Your PST files will be copied. You can repeat as needed to synchronize the data between the computers.

About the Author

Andrew McClain has been writing since 1994. He has written several articles for various websites and writes user guides and software manuals for several freelance clients. He has a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Missouri.

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